Killam Fellowships

Killam Research Fellowships

Time to pursue groundbreaking research

The Canada Council for the Arts awards Killam Research Fellowships to support outstanding scholars (normally full professors at Canadian universities and research institutes) to carry out their groundbreaking projects in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, engineering and interdisciplinary studies within these fields. The fellowships are awarded to individuals, but the funds are paid to and administered by the Canadian university or research institute that employs them.

A fellowship provides 2 years of release time

valued at

$70,000 per year

2019 Recipients

Matt Dobbs

Matt Dobbs

Natural Sciences 

McGill University

“As a team leader, I find that it is usually not productive to instruct people on next steps, and their roles. Instead, it is important to highlight their strengths, and let them volunteer for the roles they will try, and to allow them to both succeed and fail at these roles.”

Dennis Hall

Dennis Hall

Natural Sciences

University of Alberta

“I am proud that I chose a challenging postdoctoral experience in a different research field than my PhD research, as it has allowed me to ‘think outside the box’ and build the confidence to take risks in my independent career.”

Catherine Sulem

Catherine Sulem

Natural Sciences 

University of Toronto

“I have learned that among the most important elements of the process of discovery and knowledge-building are patience and humility, together with the ability to appreciate and connect different points of view.”

Marten Van Kerwijk

Marten van Kerkwijk

Natural Sciences 

University of Toronto

“Collaboration is the best, and also the most fun, way to figure something out.”

Xiao Wu

Xiao Yu (Shirley) Wu

Health Sciences

University of Toronto

“Do not be afraid of exploring new research directions and initiating new projects involving different disciplines outside your comfort zone.”

Andrei Yudin

Andrei Yudin

Natural Sciences 

University of Toronto

“Whenever I talk to prospective graduate students, I like to discuss my most outlandish ideas. It is a risk, but it helps attract the kinds of people who are well suited to work in my lab.”

The Killam Fellowship gave me the unique opportunity to focus on a type of research that required deep commitment and devotion, which would have been impossible with the multi-tasking of a regular academic life. I am grateful to the Canada Council for supporting, through me, research with Indigenous language partners.

Marie-Odile Junker
(2010 Killam Research Fellowship)

Marie-Odile Junker